Marco Brandizi's Site

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Semantic Web

A Geek's Intro to Linked Open Data

I've had a chance to give this tutorial about Linked Open Data. It was at /dev/summer/2014, a very nice 1-day meeting, packed with a great variety of topics for software developers. It was very nice to go around the presentation rooms and get a bite of so many new topics.

I've adapted the material from a similar, longer tutorial.

Lunch Break during /dev/summer/2014

Linked Open Data @SOD 2014

Me during SOD PresentationI haven't had much time recently to update this personal web site, I realise it seems abandoned. Well, the good news is that what I've been busy with is cool! :-)
 

For instance, end of March, I enjoyed working with my Italian friends from the Spaghetti Open Data Group, to deliver a 1-day tutorial on Linked Data and their applications for the cause of Open Data to the People! I was very happy of the people I worked with, they was great in providing a comprehensive presentation of different aspects of Linked Data essentials and why they're important for making data available to people in their most useful form.

There is a Google Doc, containing all the links to the materials we used that day, including presentations, demo and exercise data-to-RDF projects.

I've partiallty reused such material to prepare a much shorter presentation, going to talk about this here.

 

The EBI RDF Platform: Linked Open Data for the Life Sciences.

Jupp, S., J. Malone, J. Bolleman, M. Brandizi, M. Davies, L. Garcia, A. Gaulton, S. Gehant, C. Laibe, N. Redaschi, et al., "The EBI RDF Platform: Linked Open Data for the Life Sciences.", Bioinformatics, 2014 Jan 11.

MOTIVATION: RDF is an emerging technology for describing, publishing and linking life science data. As a major provider of bioinformatics data and services, the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) is committed to making data readily accessible to the community in ways that meet existing demand. The EBI RDF platform has been developed to meet an increasing demand to coordinate RDF activities across the institute and provides a new entry point to querying and exploring integrated resources available at the EBI.

AVAILABILITY: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/rdf.

Adventures with Biological Samples and Linked Data

A few notes on the work behind the conversion of the EBI Biosamples Database data into Linked Data.

Call for Papers: Software, Open Standards, and Computational Approaches for Collaboration in Life Sciences

[Idea light with world drawn upon, courtesy of http://www.ideachampions.com/weblogs/Big-Idea.jpg]DEADLINE IS NOW EXTENDED TO March, 14th.

Internet and the World Wide Web have made possible unimaginable levels of information sharing and collaboration in science, as well as in other human activities. In life science, software-based collaboration occurs at different scale levels, from small collocated scientific groups to large international communities. It also happens in various ways, from tight-interaction in ontology design to crowd-sourced data annotation and analysis. The idea of the web of data has been particularly successful in the biomedical field, given its potential to ease integration and exploration of large, complex, and heterogeneous data sets. Advanced knowledge representation and data exchange standards have been widely used for such purpose. These same approaches are applied in developing collaboration models and software to support such models.

Open Data during the G8 Week: the SEMIC 2013 Conference

[Dublin Rugby Stadium, SEMIC 2013 Venue]

A few notes from the SEMIC 2013 conference that I've recent attended, which happended the same days of the Open Data Charts release, by the G8.

A few notes from UK Ontology Network 2013

[UK Ontology Network]

A few notes here about the UK Ontology Network Meeting I've attended today. PDF available too.

[Cover]
As their site says:

The UK Ontology Network is an informal and voluntary coordination between people based in the United Kingdom and working in the area of ontology and ontology related technology. Members of the network include people from all areas of science and industry and across all disciplines.

It has been nice to see works in a variety of fields, where clearly there are different approaches and philosopies on designing and applying ontologies.

 

 

Knowledge sharing and collaboration in translational research, and the DC-THERA Directory.

Splendiani, A., M. Gündel, J. M. Austyn, D. Cavalieri, C. Scognamiglio, and M. Brandizi, "Knowledge sharing and collaboration in translational research, and the DC-THERA Directory.", Brief Bioinform, vol. 12, issue 6, pp. 562-75, 2011 Nov.

...In this article we introduce the DC-THERA Directory, which is an information system designed to support knowledge management for this research community and beyond. We present how the use of metadata and Semantic Web technologies can effectively help to organize the knowledge generated by modern collaborative research, how these technologies can enable effective data management solutions during and beyond the project lifecycle, and how resources such as the DC-THERA Directory fit into the larger context of e-science...
 

Web 3.0 by Kate Ray

[Web 3.0 by Kate Ray]

Web 2.0, Web 3.0, Semantic Web, a short and simple introduction.

(Late) notes from ISWC 2008

I've eventually found time to review the notes from the last International Semantic Web Conference conference and put them in a clean document. Yes, it's a bit late, but I like to put this here and maybe someone will still find it interesting.

If you like the longer reading, please see the slides below. If you're looking for just short impressions, I can summarize them as follows.

Networking with Dendritic Cells

I've recently gone to the hearth of Mediterranean, Athens, for the annual meeting of the DC-THERA network, an FP6 project. A number of people and organisations collaborate in the context of this project, under the hat of  dendritic cells research (DC). Even me, the amateurish biologist, can guess the importance of this kind of cells for the Immune system, and their consequent importance for the development of a number of vaccines and therapies.

Managing Microarray Knowledge with the Semantic Web

[MannOnto, relatedAssertions] Geeez! Eventually I have submitted the thesis and given the defense presentation! My PhD project is about representing the results coming from microarray data analysis. I represent concepts like: sets of differentially expressed genes, results from clustering algorithms, claims about the role of genes in a biological pathway. I use Semantic Web technologies and an OWL model (ontology) to provide a formal representation of such knowledge. All is focused on assertions (e.g.: "IL2 is expressed under LPS infection condition"), which may be supported by experimental evidence (e.g.: a data set) or other kinds of evaluations, including ranking and comments from the users. Moreover, users and their roles (e.g.: is an expert on Immunology) may be considedered, especially for ranking the assertions. I have also developed a demo, based on the Makna Semantic Wiki.

 

PhD project, yet another ontology

I have reviewed the OWL file once more. I have done it after analysis of study cases and considerations on making useful inference with OWL. Details are reported in the doc.

Gene Lists, Microarray Knowledge, Semantic Web

I've started this discussion on the semweb-lifesci mailing list.

I was interested in how to handle gene lists in OWL (and other lists of gene expression related entities). The discussion has expanded toward: MAGE-OM in RDF format, microarrays and Semantic Web, Semantic web technologies...

Awkward identifiers

[Figures about TO gene]
Today I discovered that a gene named "to" exists. It's not difficult to imagine how much hope you have to find it in Google. That's interesting: it was mentioned on a discussion about the use of natural language identifiers in computer science modelling. But actually maybe it is a case that shows how the Semantic Web could be useful. And complement Google. Well, Google is still able to find meaning info by means of the extended name, "takeout". So, if you already know what "to" means you'll probaly look up it on a by-keyword search engine via "takeout" + something else (drosophila, gene). I wonder if marking something like "to" with something like "is the label for..." could actually improve searches. Uhm... probably relating "to or whatever" to other resources, such as publication or chromosome or who is studying this gene, to which disease or biological process is related to, etc. Uhm... Uhm... anyway I am impressed by this "to" thing...

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